Improving Writing

Writing can be hard. It is hard to know what to say and how to say it. Additionally, the ‘right’ writing varies in different situations. It would be awkward and a little weird to text your friend “I look forward to seeing you at the coffee shop this afternoon.”  Like wise it would be very awkward to start off a paper with “IDK the causes of poverty in America but economist, G Levely, does.”

In this class, I want you to begin to use a more, formal academic tone in your writing.  That does not mean the longer the word the better.  But it does mean limiting contractions and using precise language.  Good is descriptive but not precise.  For example, “Hunger Games is a good example of poverty as exploitation” is not as strong as “The tensions between the capital and the outlying districts in the Hunger Games provides a stark illustration of poverty as exploitation.” The more precise the word or phrase, the more authoritative one sounds on the subject.  It lets the reader know why something is good or bad.


 

After improving word choice, better paragraph structure will make your essay more readable.  A clear topic sentence, strong evidence or proof, and a wrap-up builds a strong paragraph: